good ways to learn javascript, tutorials?

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rekanochi
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good ways to learn javascript, tutorials?

Post by rekanochi »

hi! i am an absolute baby beginner to javascript and it scares me but i want to learn it so i can do more funky stuff with my website
anyone know any good resources for learning js? i'm not the biggest fan of video tutorials, but as long as it helps me wrap my head around it, i'm down!
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RogerMexico
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Re: good ways to learn javascript, tutorials?

Post by RogerMexico »

rekanochi wrote: Tue Mar 28, 2023 3:04 pm hi! i am an absolute baby beginner to javascript and it scares me but i want to learn it so i can do more funky stuff with my website
Show no fear, text editors can sense fear.

Relatively speaking, JavaScript in the browser is one of the safest ways to learn how to write programs. There’s extremely little damage for beginners to do that can’t be fixed by closing and reopening your browser.
rekanochi wrote: Tue Mar 28, 2023 3:04 pm anyone know any good resources for learning js? i'm not the biggest fan of video tutorials, but as long as it helps me wrap my head around it, i'm down!
HTML Dog is still one of the better text resources on the internet, it should get you up to speed on the basics and working with the DOM. It’s a little out of date though.

MDN is a little tougher to read at the beginning of learning to program, but it’s an invaluable resource once you “get it.”
glacial_pace
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Re: good ways to learn javascript, tutorials?

Post by glacial_pace »

codeacademy is a really good tool for getting hands-on experience. they'll run you through the basics here:

https://www.codecademy.com/catalog/language/javascript

and then you can choose to keep going with harder lessons or not
Starfia
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Small projects are good for beginners.

Post by Starfia »

One of my trustiest methods, in any creative area, is essentially to…

1. Think of a small project I want to do
2. Look up whatever I need to look up to do it

Emphasis on small, because beginners have to start by learning one or two concepts at a time, whether they're broad (like what a program is) or specific (like what an equals sign or semicolon means in JavaScript).

So, if your goal is to create a video game on the web, maybe you start by just aiming to get the browser to play one sound effect one time, so you look up "how to play a sound with JavaScript" or something. Maybe even that turns out to be too hard, and you end up just aiming to print "hello" on the page without a pre-written HTML tag. Any which way, you learn something, and you learn to guess how easy or difficult learning the next thing might be.

Meanwhile, I suggest doing a little general reading on JavaScript. Enthusiast web-weavers learn largely by example, which is important, but the ability to understand and express basic concepts as conceived by the inventors of these technologies can enhance your intuition and protect you from attempting things in needlessly weird and circuitous ways. I'd say MDN is probably the most accessible, reputable and free source of documentation on all Web standards including JavaScript – I think it's written largely by the same people who work on Firefox, but there are certainly others.
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